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Bhardwaj Lake Trek

Trek the surviving remnant of Aravali hills

  • The trail takes you to a man-made lake inside the sanctuary.
  • A perfect family trek
  • Out of the eight nearby lakes, Bhardwaj is the largest.
  • The lake is a result of mining inside the sanctuary
DIFFICULTY:

Easy

TRAIL TYPE:

A semi arid jungle trail

DURATION:

1 days

ROAD HEAD:

Pali road

BEST SEASON:

Anytime of the year

Bhardwaj Lake Trek is a 4-hour trek from Delhi apt for beginners and families

Trekking is not a popular sport in Delhi despite its proximity to few of the most lovely treks in India, such as this one. This jungle trail is laid out in the ecologically fragile Aravali Hills. It’s a simple trek, apt for families who want a few hours out of the urban landscape.

Delhi is surrounded by a large, surviving remnant of Aravali hills. This forested Delhi ridge comes under the protection of Asola Wildlife Sanctuary. The semi arid forest has some of the most adventurous and least-trodden-upon nature trails. They make for interesting day hikes. The exhilaration of trekking through a semi arid jungle trail, with a chance to site a wild leopard, is good enough to get you on  your feet and set you off.del

The total distance of the Bhardwaj Lake Trek is around eight kilometres. It takes about 3-4 hours to cover this distance. It takes an hour and a half to reach the start of the trek from Kashmiri Gate metro station.

The trail starts exactly opposite to the college of traffic management.  The trail is also called Pali Road and it ends at Gurgaon. However, locals there don’t know much about Bhardwaj lake, although they know about other lakes around the region.

Author:

Vaibhav Chauhan

Bhardwaj Lake Trek Guide

The total distance of the Bhardwaj Lake Trek is around eight kilometres. It takes about 3-4 hours to cover this distance. It takes an hour and a half to reach the start of the trek from Kashmiri Gate metro station.

The trail starts exactly opposite to the college of traffic management.  The trail is also called Pali Road and it ends at Gurgaon. However, locals there don’t know much about Bhardwaj lake, although they know about other lakes around the region.

Bhardwaj Lake Trek
Trail leading to Bhardwaj Lake

Staying true to the trail, keep walking till you find second secluded house on the left of the trail. The trail now splits further into two. Take the one that stretches straight ahead, ignoring the one heading right. Keep walking along the trail. Avoid taking any side trails on the way. Ahead of you, look for two lakes that can be seen from a distance. The lake on your left is Death Valley lake. The one on your right is Bhardwaj lake.

Bhardwaj Lake Trek
Banks of Bhardwaj Lake

Walk towards Bhardwaj lake. There are multiple trails that take you to the lake’s shore. The lake is large and beautiful. The water is surprisingly clear and abundant with fresh water fishes.

You can spend the day here. Trace the same route to return.

Cardiovascular endurance

The secret to ascending any trail lies in building your cardiovascular endurance. You can begin by jogging everyday. Ideally, you should be able to jog 4 km in 20 minutes before the start of the trek. It takes time to be able to cover this distance in the given time. Start slow and increase your pace everyday. Swimming, cycling and stair climbing without too many breaks in between can help too. Strength This is another area you should work on. You will need to build strength in your muscles and in your core body. You can do some squats to strengthen your leg muscles. Do around 3 sets of squats, with 8 squats in each set. Apart from this, you can add planks and crunches to your work out.

Flexibility

Another aspect that will help you trek comfortably is flexibility. For this, you can do some stretching exercises – stretch your hamstrings, quadriceps, hip flexors, lower back muscles and shoulders regularly. Carrying a backpack, however light, can become a strain after a while. These exercises will help you to be in good shape before the trek. Working out indoors


If you can’t go out and jog because of time and space constraints,
here’s a video you can use to work out indoors.

backpack

No, stuffing it all in isn’t the right way to do it Packing a backpack correctly saves precious time that you might waste trying to find your things later. It is wise to spend some time on learning what really goes into packing a backpack.

What should I pack? On a trek, you only get what you take. Something as simple as a forgotten matchbox can cripple your cooking plans throughout the trek. So, it’s essential to prepare early and prepare well. To begin with, make a checklist. While shopping, remember this thumb rule – keep it light. “Every item needs to be light. This ensures that your backpack, on the whole, stays light,” says Sandhya UC, co-founder of Indiahikes. Balancing out heavy items with light ones isn’t going to have the same effect as having all light items. “Always opt for good quality, light items,” says Sandhya.

How much should my bag weigh?

“Your backpack for a weekend trek should weigh between 8 and 10 kg,” explains Arjun Majumdar, co-founder of Indiahikes, “To break it down, your tent should weigh around 2.5 kg, your sleeping bag, around 1.5 kg, and the ration, stove and clothes should constitute the other 5 kg.” The best way to plan is by concentrating on the basic necessities – food, shelter and clothes. Gather only those things that you’ll need to survive. Do not pack for ‘if’ situations. “That’s one of the common mistakes that people make – packing for ‘if situations’. It only adds to the baggage that you can do without on a trek,” says Sandhya.

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Trekking hack

One good way to go about it is to prepare a list of absolute essentials. Start with the most essential and end with the least essential. That way, when you feel you are overshooting the limit, you can start eliminating from the bottom. Another tip is to be smart while packing clothes. Invest in light. wash and wear fabrics. “Replace a sweater with two t-shirts,” adds Sandhya. Layering is the mantra when it comes to trekking. Refer to Sandhya’s clothes list to pack smart.

How to pack The thumb rule for this one is to eliminate air spaces. Make sure that everything is packed tightly, especially clothes and jackets, as they tend to take up maximum air space. Put in all the large items first. Then squeeze in the smaller ones in the gaps. This ensures minimum air space. A good way to pack clothes is by using the Ranger Roll method.

 

Where to pack Bottom Sleeping bag: Make this your base layer. Sleeping bags tend to be voluminous, but do not weigh much. They’re perfect for the bottom of the bag. Tent: Just like the sleeping bag, even tents are voluminous and light. Keep the tent poles separately and place the fabric at the bottom of the backpack. Middle Heavy jacket: Roll up the jacket in a tight ball and place it in the middle of the backpack, close to your back. The middle region of the backpack should always have the heaviest items. You can store other things like ration or mini stoves in the middle. Other clothes: Roll other clothes and place them in the remaining space, to fill air gaps.

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Backpack essentials

Top Water: Water, although heavy, needs to be easily accessible. So put it in the top most region of your backpack. Medicine box: This is another component that you wouldn’t want to be scavenging for when in need. Poncho: It could rain at any time in the mountains. So, ponchos should be accessible easily. Also, having a waterproof poncho at the top of the backpack provides additional waterproofing to items in the bag.

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Vaibhav Chauhan

Vaibhav was associated with Indiahikes as a Writer & Chief Explorer. He is an avid traveler with a passion for trekking in Indian Himalayas. With his roots in Shimla district of Himachal Pradesh, the love for the mountains is in his blood. When not travelling he likes to spend time interacting with like-minded trek enthusiasts and read books on travel and mountaineering.