Triund Trek

Duration 2 Days Difficulty Easy

Overview

Trek alongside rhododendrons and oaks, and camp in a cave

Located 18 km from Dharmshala, Triund makes for an attractive trekking destination, with well-defined forest trails and breath-taking views of the entire Kangra valley. The view of the evening sky from Triund is a good enough reason to pitch a tent here for the night. The length of the trek makes it apt for a weekend.

Although the trek from McLeodganj to Triund is a steep ascent of over 1,100 metres, it is well-compensated by refreshing walks amongst rhododendron and oak trees. There is no dearth of eating options as there are several cafes on the way, like Magic View, Scenic View and Snowline Café.

The town of McLeodganj (also known as little Lhasa) provides for a grand opportunity to experience the vibrant Tibetan culture. The trekking scene here is well-organised and one can embark on multiple treks of longer duration here, namely Indrahar Pass, Minkiani Pass, Kareri Lake and all the way to Kuarsi Pass and Mani-Mahesh. If you have a day to spare, fancy trekking from Triund till Lahesh Cave and explore the meadows below Indrahar Pass.

Triund Trek Description

This is a small and an easy trek, which can be done either from McLeodganj or Dharamkot, which is 2 km ahead of McLeodganj. The trail is 7 km from Dharamkot and passes Galu Devi temple. From this temple, it takes around 3 hours to reach Triund. The initial half of the trek is a gradual incline and the last 2 km from Snowline Café involve a steep climb all the way till Triund (2,975 metres). 

How to reach McLeodganj

Reach Dharamshala which is a major town, 9 km before McLeodganj via overnight bus from New Delhi. Himachal Roadways and Himachal Tourism have regular bus services from Kashmiri Gate ISBT Delhi from 5 pm onwards. One can travel in Volvo bus and book tickets online at:

  1.  http://www.hrtc.gov.in/hrtctickets/
  2.  http://hp.gov.in/hptdc/Common/Register.aspx

From Dharamshala, there are regular local buses to McLeodganj every half hour, plying from 7 am to 8 pm. You can also take a shared cab to McLeodganj or Dharamkot.

Author: Vaibhav Chauhan

This documentation was written with inputs from Bibek Bhattcharya and Hiramani Kashyap.

An Alternative Indiahikes trek you can try:

If you are not too sure of doing a trek on your own, we have alternatives you can try. While we are currently not operational in the area near Dharamshala,  we think Kheerganga-Buni Buni Pass would be a good alternative.

Not only do you walk along the pines and the bubbling Parvati river near Kheerganga, you also trek through dense oak forests which give way to vast meadows with wonderful views of snow capped mountains.

Check out the Kheerganga-Buni Buni Pass trek here.

But if you’re a first time trekker, the process of organizing a trek by yourself might get a bit overwhelming. If you want to trek with your family or friend then you might not want the hassle of doing it. In such cases, we have a couple of great treks for you.

At the same time, the trail to Triund has become popular and bit too crowded. Therefore if you’re looking for a peaceful walk in the woods, Triund unfortunately is not that.

If you have a couple of days more in hand, Beas Kund is great option. The starting point of the trek is Solang, just an hour’s drive from Manali. That makes it very easy to accessible. If you’re a beginner, it is the perfect trek with great views of biggest mountains of Manali. Moreover, you get to stand right at the base of the Pir Panjal Range.

View of Hanuman Tibba on the way

Read more about Beas Kund Trek here

If you don’t have as much time though, the Pundrik Lake trek is just perfect for the weekend.

Surrounded by giant pine and fir trees, Pundrik lake is a hidden treasure in Himachal Pradesh. The thick forests through which the trail winds are a bird watcher’s paradise

Weekend Treks in Himalayas - Pundrik Lake
Views on the Pundrik Lake Trek

The dense forests on this trek are filled with pine, fir, spruce and a variety of other trees. Pundrik lake, covered by tall grasses runs for 400 metres and is surrounded by forests on three sides.

Read more about Pundrik Lake here

 

Trek Details

Trek alongside rhododendrons and oaks, and camp in a cave

Triund trek in Dharamshala

Although the trek from McLeodganj to Triund is a steep ascent of over 1,100 metres, it is well-compensated by refreshing walks amongst rhododendron and oak trees. There is no dearth of eating options as there are several cafes on the way, like Magic View, Scenic View and Snowline Café.

The town of McLeodganj (also known as little Lhasa) provides for a grand opportunity to experience the vibrant Tibetan culture. The trekking scene here is well-organised and one can embark on multiple treks of longer duration here, namely Indrahar Pass, Minkiani Pass, Kareri Lake and all the way to Kuarsi Pass and Mani-Mahesh. If you have a day to spare, fancy trekking from Triund till Lahesh Cave and explore the meadows below Indrahar Pass.

Trek Description

This is a small and an easy trek, which can be done either from McLeodganj or Dharamkot, which is 2 km ahead of McLeodganj. The trail is 7 km from Dharamkot and passes Galu Devi temple. From this temple, it takes around 3 hours to reach Triund. The initial half of the trek is a gradual incline and the last 2 km from Snowline Café involve a steep climb all the way till Triund (2,975 metres). 

How to reach McLeodgang

Reach Dharamshala which is a major town, 9 km before McLeodganj via overnight bus from New Delhi. Himachal Roadways and Himachal Tourism have regular bus services from Kashmiri Gate ISBT Delhi from 5 pm onwards. One can travel in Volvo bus and book tickets online at:

  1.  http://www.hrtc.gov.in/hrtctickets/
  2.  http://hp.gov.in/hptdc/Common/Register.aspx

From Dharamshala, there are regular local buses to McLeodganj every half hour, plying from 7 am to 8 pm. You can also take a shared cab to McLeodganj or Dharamkot.

How to do the trek

Day 1: Bhagsu/Dharamkot to Triund via Galu Devta:

  • Altitude: 6,184 ft to 9,760 ft
  • Distance: 7 km
  • Time taken: 3 hours

Bhagsu and Dharamkot are two villages situated about 2 km up the ridge from McLeodganj. Both of them can be considered road heads. The trail from Dharamkot is arguably the nicer one as it climbs through the thick crown of pine forests above the village. Walk up through the forest for about 15 minutes before you get to the Galu temple clearing. 

Forests along the Triund Trek
On the way to Ganu Mata Mandir from Dharamkot Village

There’s a small tea shop here, just below the shrine. From here, one trail goes south-west into the forest to the village of Naddi. Another forest trail goes north-west, to the stream that descends from Laka. The main trail to Triund continues straight past the small shrine. The trail is a gently rising one, through oak thickets and traverses the steep side of the Laka ridge, following its contour. Dharamkot and Bhagsu lie directly below this trail.

Views from Ganu Mata temple on Triund Trek
From Ganu Mata Mandir to Triund

Approximately halfway up the trail is a deep gully that traverses a steep section and emerges on a rocky spur. The main Dhauladhar range, which passes out of view as you ascend from Dharamkot, swings into view here. The pyramidal peak of Mon appearing larger than life. This entire stretch is perfect for birdwatchers, as the forests here are literally swarming with various kinds of songbirds. Past the Magic View Café, the trail gets steeper. At this point, the Dharamkot spur of the Laka ridge meets the Triund ridge at right angles, creating a series of steep gullies that end up in thickly wooded chasms. 

As you walk towards Triund
Towards Triund

The trail continues through a series of steep switchbacks. It climbs the Triund ridge through dense thickets of rhododendron and oak trees. It’s a pleasant, if slightly strenuous climb from here to Triund in good weather. Watch your step when it’s raining, as the path turns into mush. The last couple of switchbacks bring you out of the rhododendrons and out onto the Triund ridge. It’s an open grassy ridge that stretches a good kilometre to the south, before plunging into the Kangra valley. There are plenty of places to camp. You could even get some provisions at the four tea shops here. From Triund, marvel the immaculate views of Dhauladhar ranges, namely Mun (4,610 m), Rifle Horn, Arthur’s seat & Slab (4,570 m). Water is scarce and is available some 1 km before Triund.

It is highly advisable to carry your own supply of drinking water up here. Forest rest house is the only option for night stay at Triund. Advance booking is required and can be done at Dharamshala. It is advisable to carry your own tent and sleeping bag here. During trekking season you will have presence of dhabas at Triund where you can get a cooked meal and refreshments.

Day 2 (Optional): Triund – Laka – Lahesh cave – Dharamkot

  • Altitude: 9,760 ft to 11,646 ft
  • Distance: 25 km
  • Time taken: 6-7 hours

Start early today as there is lot of trekking involved. The trail goes north, up the Triund ridge, past the forest guest house and a small Devi shrine.

The ridge begins to rise in a very typical Dhauladhar way of cascading boulders. The trail keeps up with the Chauran nala chasm to the right, rising through more rhododendron and oak thickets and the occasional grassy ledge. The Gaddis maintain the stone trail here very well, as it goes past a couple of shrines. As the the range looms into view, the trail veers to the east and starts a steep traverse to get to the top of the Laka ridge.

A Small dhaba on Triund Trek
Tea Shop at Laka

The views from here are magnificent. To the east, the Dhauladhar ridge rises in a series of peaks, the most prominent of which goes by the local name of Narwana. Below, lie the green grassy ridges of Triund and just beside the trail are deep wooded chasms through which run the various streams that drain the southern face of the Dhauladhar.

Past the steep incline, the path enters rolling pastures and reaches the camping ground of Laka. This marks the uppermost portion of the Dhauladhar foothills. The upper main ridge of the Dhauladhar looms above the little bowl of Laka to the North East, with Mon dominating the scene.

A number of deep boulder fields descend the face of the ridge to Laka. The true trail to Lahesh cave and Indrahar goes up the northernmost boulder field. It is extremely important that you do not take the wrong path as it’s very easy to get lost in the maze of the upper boulder fields. There’s a small tea shop, where you could take a breather before continuing.

Upper Dhualadhar on Triund Trek
Upper Dhauldhar-Lahesh

The trail crosses two boulder fields, usually laden with snow in May, June and again in October. At other times, you’ll have to ford the shallow, but quick-flowing streams that go down them and start climbing up the steep, boulder-filled mountain side. The upper sections of the range rise up in gigantic, tiered bounds of striated rocks that loom over the trail like some gigantic medieval castle. The shepherds have installed an ingenious system of cairns to guide the way through this steep maze. For orientation, stick close to the true right of the stream and continue up the rib of the rock-face. After about an hour’s strenuous climbing, you’ll arrive at Lahesh cave, which is basically a long and deep fissure in a wedge between two huge boulders. It’s a nice and dry camping spot, as long as you quickly get used to the fact that you won’t ever have the space to do anything but squat on your haunches when you’re in the cave. The natural courtyard in front of the cave commands a great view of the lower ridges of the Dhauladhar and the Kangra valley. The rock-face around the cave is pretty steep, although, during monsoon, you’ll find thousands of alpine flowers blooming on small grassy ridges. Locating the cave can be tricky, as there are multiple caves in the vicinity. If not travelling with a guide, make sure to tag along experienced trekkers to find the way. To go back, retrace the route you took to reach Lahesh cave, all the way back to Dharamkot. An all descending trail allows trekking quickly and covering distance in lesser time. 

This post was written with inputs from Bibek Bhattcharya and Hiramani Kashyap.

Get trek fit!

How to get fit for the Triund Trek

In terms of difficulty, the Triund trek is classified as Easy. 

Cardiovascular endurance


For two days, you will cover a distance of 32 km. You will trek up to an altitude of 11,646. The secret to covering this distance comfortably lies in building your cardiovascular endurance. 
You can begin by jogging everyday. Ideally, you should be able to jog 4 km in 20 minutes before the start of the trek. It takes time to be able to cover this distance in the given time. Start slow and increase your pace everyday. Swimming, cycling and stair climbing without too many breaks in between can help too. 

Strength


This is another area you should work on. You will need to build strength in your muscles and in your core body. You can do some squats to strengthen your leg muscles. Do around 3 sets of squats, with 8 squats in each set. Apart from this, you can add planks and crunches to your work out.

Flexibility


Another aspect that will help you trek comfortably is flexibility. For this, you can do some stretching exercises – stretch your hamstrings, quadriceps, hip flexors, lower back muscles and shoulders regularly. Carrying a backpack, however light, can become a strain after a while. These exercises will help you to be in good shape before the trek.

Working out indoors


If you can’t go out and jog because of time and space constraints,
here’s a video you can use to work out indoors.

What to pack?

What to take on the Triund trek

Bare necessities

  1. Trekking shoes: There will be several slippery patches on the trail, and you will need trekking shoes with good grip. Sports shoes will not be comfortable enough. You can watch this video to learn to choose the right trekking shoes
  2. Backpack (40-60 litres): A backpack with sturdy straps and a supporting frame. Rain cover for backpack is essential.

Clothes

  1. Two warm layers: At the campsites, especially the higher ones, the temperature after sundown will drop to around 2-6 degrees. You will need at least three warm layers (two lights layers such as fleece and woollen and one padded jacket) for this trek.
  2. Two trek pants: One pair of pants should suffice for this trek. But you can carry one spare pair in case the first one gets wet. Wear one pair and carry one pair. 
  3. Two collared t-shirts: Carry light, full sleeved t-shirts that prevent sun burns on the neck and arms. Again, wear one and carry one.
  4. Thermals (Optional): Those who are more susceptible to cold can carry thermals to wear at night.

Accessories

  1. Sunglasses: Sunglasses are to prevent snow blindness. There might be snow closer to the lake, so carry a pair of sunglasses. 
  2. SuncapThe sun is more 
  3. Synthetic hand gloves: One pair of fleece or woolen hand gloves. One pair of water proof/resistant, wind proof gloves.
  4. Balaclava: You may use woollen scarves instead as well.
  5. Socks (2 pairs): Apart from two sports socks, you can take a pair of woollen socks for the night.
  6. Headlamp/LED torch: Mandatory
  7. Trekking pole: Watch this video to understand why you need a trekking pole.

Others

  1. Daypack (20 litres): If you are offloading your backpack, you will need a smaller backpack to carry water, medical kit and some light snacks. 
  2. Toiletries (Sunscreen, moisturiser, light towel, lip balm, toilet paper, toothbrush, toothpaste)
  3. Cutlery: Carry a spoon, coffee mug and a lunch box. We insist on trekkers getting their own cutlery for hygiene reasons. 
  4. Two water bottles: 1 litre each
  5. Plastic covers: While packing, use plastic bags to compartmentalise things and carry few extra plastic bags for wet clothes.

Mandatory Personal Medical Kit 

  1. Diamox – 10 tablets (to prevent AMS)
  2. Crocin – 6 tablets (fever)
  3. Avomine – 4 tablets (motion sickness)
  4. Avil 25mg – 4 tablets (allergies)
  5. Combiflam – 4 tablets (Pain killer)
  6. Disprin – 6 tablets (headache)
  7. Norflox TZ & Lomofen– 6 tablets each (diarrhea)
  8. Digene – 10 tablets (acidity)
  9. Omez/ Rantadine – 10 tablets (antacids)
  10. Crepe bandage – 3 to 5 meters
  11. Gauze – 1 small roll
  12. Band aid – 10 strips
  13. Cotton – 1 small roll
  14. ORS – 10 packets
  15. Betadine or any antiseptic cream
  16. Moov spray (aches, & sprains)

Mandatory Documents

Please carry the below documents. Document two and three need to be downloaded (PDF), filled in, signed and handed over to the trek leader at the base camp. 
  • Original and photocopy of government photo identity card- (driving license, voters ID, etc.)
  • Medical Certificate and Disclaimer (to be filled by the trekker) – Download PDF
  • Medical certificate (to be filled by a doctor) – Download PDF

If you’re shopping or packing for the trek, you can download this quick and simple checklist for offline use.

 

 

Last updated

May - 2019
Update trek info