We have launched Trekking Summer Camps for children!
We have launched Trekking Summer Camps for children!

QUICK INFORMATION ON ALI BEDNI BUGYAL

TREK DIFFICULTY

TREK DURATION

8 days

HIGHEST ALTITUDE

12,550 feet / 3,825 meters

TRAIL LENGTH

Approx 29 km

TREK STARTS FROM

Age Group

8 to 62

FITNESS REQUIRED

Able to run 5 km in under 35 mins before your trek. More details

WHAT TO CARRY

Up to 8-9 kgs backpack which contains .

RENT GEAR

High quality gear available on rent

CLOAKROOM

A cloakroom is available to keep one bag (No valuables must be kept)

TREK DIFFICULTY

TREK DURATION

8 days

HIGHEST ALTITUDE

12,550 feet / 3,825 meters

TRAIL LENGTH

Approx 29 km

Ali Bedni Bugyal Trek

The Only Meadow Trek With Stunning Mountain Views

Out of the other meadow treks in our country — Dayara Bugyal, Gidara Bugyal, and Bhrigu Lake trek — Ali Bedni has the grandest of mountain views. That’s because of one thing —  the sight of Mt. Trishul and Mt. Nanda Ghunti jutting right out of the meadows.

Jutting out doesn’t mean you see the tops of these mountains, you see the entire face — almost 6000-7000 feet of it — rising right in front of you.

The spring season is about to end on the Ali-Bedni Bugyal trek. Soon, green meadows will start peeping out from under the snow.

By summer, you see meadows carpeted with fresh grass.

The surprise of finding yourself in Ali Bugyal after trekking through dense forests is unbeatable. The moment you get out of the shades of the forest cover, you see acres and acres of green carpet sprawled out in front of you. Mt Trishul, stands tall against the blue skies, making for a formidable backdrop. Horses and their foals tear themselves across the turf in an uninhibited abandon while the cattle graze lazily on this bounty.

The walk to Bedni Bugyal from here is exhilarating! It is a walk that tempts you to take off your shoes and feel this carpet for yourselves. The Bedni Bugyal is another stop in this meadow country – a strip of vibrant green, overlooking the western valley.  Popping right out of this meadow-like sentient, silent guards are the mountains of Trishul and Nanda Ghunti. If you climb the Bedni Top, other high risers of the imposing Chaukhamba range open up before you. These incredible settings make these twin meadows a must-do on the trekker’s bucket list.

Ali Bedni Bugyal Videos

Recommended Videos Before Going For The Trek

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Quick Itinerary

Trek Map of the Ali Bedni Bugyal trek

Day 1

Drive from Rishikesh to Lohajung

Drive distance: 260 km | Drive Duration: 10-11 hours | Pick up Time: 5 am

Reach Lohajung; 10-11 hours drive from Rishikesh. Transport will be arranged from Live Free Hostel, Rishikesh at 5.00 am.

The cost of a cab is Rs 7,000 per vehicle and the cost of a Tempo Traveller is Rs 11,000, which is to be paid by trekkers directly to the driver.

Day 2

Trek from Lohajung to Didna

Trek Distance: 8 km | Trek Duration: 5 hours | Altitude gain: 7,550 ft to 8,150 ft

Day 3

Trek Didna to Abin Kharak via Ali Bugyal

Trek Distance: 9.3 km | Trek Duration: 6 hours | Altitude gain: 8,150 ft to 11,145 ft via 11,550 ft

Day 4

Trek from Abin Kharak to Gehroli Patal via Bedni Bugyal

Trek Distance: 5.60 km | Trek Duration: 4 hours | Altitude gain & loss: 11,145 ft to 10,350 ft via 12,550 ft

Day 5

Trek from Gehroli Patal to Wan. Drive from Wan to Lohajung

Trek Distance: 6.30 km | Trek Duration: 5 hours | Altitude loss: 10,350 ft to 7,550 ft

Day 6

Drive from Lohajung to Rishikesh

Drive distance: 260 km | Drive Duration: 10-11 hours | Drop off Time: 7 pm

Reach Rishikesh; 10-11 hours drive from Lohajung. Transport will be organized by Indiahikes. Cab cost is Rs 7,000 per vehicle, for an SUV and Rs 11,000 per vehicle, for a Tempo Traveller which is to be paid by trekkers directly to the driver.

Please note: The distance between campsites may vary by 100 meters depending the weather conditions and the route you take. The altitude may also vary by 100 feet for similar reasons.

IMPORTANT POINTS

Documents required: Trekkers must carry a copy of their photo ID for entry at forest check posts on the trek. These documents will be part of the Safety Check-in done by the trek leader when you arrive at the base camp.

Stay facility: There are no facilities at Lohajung. Ensure you have all the gears required before reaching the basecamp. Do not bring any packaged food, tags from your new clothes, or any waste with you. We follow a Dustbin Free Zone and No Wet Wipes Policy at our base camps in line with our spirit of Green Trails. Please note that you will be staying in tents (twin sharing) on all days of the trek.

Cloakroom facility for excess luggage: We have a Cloak Room facility at the base camp for excess luggage. Do not leave behind any valuables in the cloakroom.

Trek Map of the Ali Bedni Bugyal trek

PRO-TIPS

Onward Travel

You'll love the drive to Lohajung. The drive is very scenic along the mighty Ganges. You would be enjoying the view of the Sangam of many rivers which form the Ganges; Devprayag, Rudraprayag, and Karnprayag are a treat for the eyes.

After Karnprayag, you would be travelling alongside the Pindar River. You then enter the beautiful valley of the Chamoli region. Keep your eyes open and look out, the glimpses of the big mountains are visible from Dewal onwards.

Try getting the seat on the left-hand side to get some stunning moments during your travel. The journey itself is a visual treat both ways.

Return Travel

The drive back to Rishikesh follows the same route you took on your way up. The route is along the tributaries of Ganga. The road goes along hugging the mountainside and you see the forests and valleys of Garhwal below you.

Download the GPX file for your Ali Bedni Bugyal Trek

We go to great lengths to ensure you have a safe trek. So here’s a GPX file to help you navigate without getting lost.

Day 1

Drive from Rishikesh to Lohajung

Drive distance: 260 km | Drive Duration: 10-11 hours | Pick up Time: 5 am

Reach Lohajung; 10-11 hours drive from Rishikesh. Transport will be arranged from Live Free Hostel, Rishikesh at 5.00 am.

The cost of a cab is Rs 7,000 per vehicle and the cost of a Tempo Traveller is Rs 11,000, which is to be paid by trekkers directly to the driver.

Day 2

Trek from Lohajung to Didna

Trek Distance: 8 km | Trek Duration: 5 hours | Altitude gain: 7,550 ft to 8,150 ft

Day 3

Trek Didna to Abin Kharak via Ali Bugyal

Trek Distance: 9.3 km | Trek Duration: 6 hours | Altitude gain: 8,150 ft to 11,145 ft via 11,550 ft

Day 4

Trek from Abin Kharak to Gehroli Patal via Bedni Bugyal

Trek Distance: 5.60 km | Trek Duration: 4 hours | Altitude gain & loss: 11,145 ft to 10,350 ft via 12,550 ft

Day 5

Trek from Gehroli Patal to Wan. Drive from Wan to Lohajung

Trek Distance: 6.30 km | Trek Duration: 5 hours | Altitude loss: 10,350 ft to 7,550 ft

Day 6

Drive from Lohajung to Rishikesh

Drive distance: 260 km | Drive Duration: 10-11 hours | Drop off Time: 7 pm

Reach Rishikesh; 10-11 hours drive from Lohajung. Transport will be organized by Indiahikes. Cab cost is Rs 7,000 per vehicle, for an SUV and Rs 11,000 per vehicle, for a Tempo Traveller which is to be paid by trekkers directly to the driver.

Please note: The distance between campsites may vary by 100 meters depending the weather conditions and the route you take. The altitude may also vary by 100 feet for similar reasons.

IMPORTANT POINTS

➤Documents required: Trekkers must carry a copy of their photo ID for entry at forest check posts on the trek. These documents will be part of the Safety Check-in done by the trek leader when you arrive at the base camp.

➤Stay facility: There are no facilities at Lohajung. Ensure you have all the gears required before reaching the basecamp. Do not bring any packaged food, tags from your new clothes, or any waste with you. We follow a Dustbin Free Zone and No Wet Wipes Policy at our base camps in line with our spirit of Green Trails. Please note that you will be staying in tents (twin sharing) on all days of the trek.

➤Cloakroom facility for excess luggage: We have a Cloak Room facility at the base camp for excess luggage. Do not leave behind any valuables in the cloakroom.

PRO-TIPS

Onward Travel

You'll love the drive to Lohajung. The drive is very scenic along the mighty Ganges. You would be enjoying the view of the Sangam of many rivers which form the Ganges; Devprayag, Rudraprayag, and Karnprayag are a treat for the eyes.

After Karnprayag, you would be travelling alongside the Pindar River. You then enter the beautiful valley of the Chamoli region. Keep your eyes open and look out, the glimpses of the big mountains are visible from Dewal onwards.

Try getting the seat on the left-hand side to get some stunning moments during your travel. The journey itself is a visual treat both ways.

Return Travel

The drive back to Rishikesh follows the same route you took on your way up. The route is along the tributaries of Ganga. The road goes along hugging the mountainside and you see the forests and valleys of Garhwal below you.

Download the GPX file for your Ali Bedni Bugyal Trek

We go to great lengths to ensure you have a safe trek. So here’s a GPX file to help you navigate without getting lost.

The forests of this trek are buried in snow in winter. It's a challenging snow walk throughout the months of December, January and February.

Picture by: Ravi Ranjan

A Wintry Forest Walk

Arjun Majumdar, Founder, CEO

Here is Arjun Majumdar, Founder and CEO of Indiahikes talking about Ali Bedni Bugyal. Arjun is an entrepreneur by profession and a trekker by passion, Arjun started Indiahikes in 2008 with a vision to explore and document new trails, solve problems in the mountains and implement sustainable ways of trekking.

What I Like About the Ali Bedni Bugyal Trek

What I Like About the Ali Bedni Bugyal Trek

Arjun Majumdar, Founder, CEO

Here is Arjun Majumdar, Founder and CEO of Indiahikes talking about Ali Bedni Bugyal. Arjun is an entrepreneur by profession and a trekker by passion, Arjun started Indiahikes in 2008 with a vision to explore and document new trails, solve problems in the mountains and implement sustainable ways of trekking.

1. Grand Mountain Views From The Most Beautiful Meadows Of Our Country

You see Mt Trishul and Mt Nanda Ghunti in their grandest of views. They are jutting out. By jutting out I mean you see their full face, like the entire 6,000-7,000 feet of Mt Trishul right in front of you. Imagine the grandiosity with the sun setting on it. 

You haven’t seen such grand views on any trek. Forget about any meadow trek. 

To add to it, you are at around 11,500 feet with the evening rays on Mt Trishul, especially from Bedni Bugyal. It is a powerful sight. I have seen trekkers standing in these meadows with tears in their eyes. 

And I want you to watch this.

The views of Mt Trishul and Mt Nanda Ghunti on the Ali Bedni Bugyal trek are incomparable to any other trek. Picture by Dhaval Jajal taken in March 2021

2. Unforgettable sunrises and sunsets while camping at Abin Kharak

You may not know this, but we have an extra camp near Ali Bugyal called Abin Kharak. This is just off the meadows. You can get in and out of the meadows quickly from here. 

Watch out for this campsite. You won’t get a more rewarding experience on a trek. Now you have the opportunity to not just see the sunsets but also the sunrise from these meadows.

Early morning rays touching Mt. Trishul Photo by Sudarshan Jaganathan.

3. A unique experience of trekking through ancient and dense forests

The oak and rhododendron forest on the Ali-Bedni Bugyal trek are the densest I have trekked in. Perhaps, they are also the rarest because most of these trees are easily a thousand years old.

They are so grand and so old. And you are meandering through these trees with their roots all over the ground. It’s not something you will experience on most treks. 

Especially if you do it early in the morning, as we are going to be doing it. 

In many places, you see sunlight falling from spectacular angles. It’s a photographer’s delight to catch these sun rays falling through the leaves at charming angles. It creates lovely lighting.

Evening light in the forests of Ghaeroli Patal. Picture by Arvind Kumar

Know Your Trek

We have always wanted trekkers to be well-informed before they go on a Himalayan trek. Knowledge is the difference between a safe trek and a dangerous one. It’s also the difference between a wholesome experience and a superficial experience.

Use this section to learn about the Ali Bedni Bugyal trek. It has in-depth information about each day of the trek, what to expect, and how you need to prepare for it. Many years of expertise have gone into this content. Trekkers find that extremely useful.

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PRO TIPS

The spirit of trekking is a set of values and principles that encourages us to trek more mindfully. It is a map that guides our behaviour on a trek. 

It shows us how to be open to adventure and why it is important to blend in with nature. It tells us why we need to be self-sufficient and supportive towards fellow trekkers. It guides us to be fit and prepared for a trek. It also tells us why it is critical to protect the environment.

Here they are, in brief, the six principles of our Indiahikes’ Spirit of Trekking.

Why do we trek the way we do at Indiahikes

What is the Indiahikes Spirit of Trekking

The spirit of trekking is a set of values and principles that encourages us to trek more mindfully. It is a map that guides our behaviour on a trek.  It shows us how to be open to adventure and why it is important to blend in with nature. It tells us why we need to be self-sufficient and supportive towards fellow trekkers. It guides us to be fit and prepared for a trek. It also tells us why it is critical to protect the environment. Here they are, in brief, the six principles of our Indiahikes’ Spirit of Trekking.

1. We are always up for an adventure

The first principle of the spirit of trekking is to be open to adventure. This mindset encourages you to embrace the challenge of the trek. It allows you to immerse yourself fully in the trek. 

I’ve learned that trekking will not always be easy. Sometimes things may not go as planned. But that's the beauty of it. It means preparing for whatever may come your way and learning to take the good with the bad.

By accepting the ups and downs of the trek, I could push myself outside of my comfort zone. I was able to experience things that I never thought were possible. 

Once, the wind blew so hard that we couldn't pitch our tents. We were at 12,000 feet. We had to walk for another six hours to find shelter. We had to spend the freezing night in a dilapidated shepherd’s hut. The same night, unable to sleep, I saw one of the best sights of the Milky Way. 

I could enjoy a trek even in less favourable weather conditions — rain, snow, or sunshine. This allowed me to have an unforgettable experience. It helped me to understand the true meaning of adventure.

The mindset of embracing challenges helped me become more resilient. It taught me that I am capable of more than I ever imagined.

Being open to adventure means being open to new perspectives and ways of thinking. It encourages a mindset of flexibility and adaptability.

2. We blend in with nature

The second principle of the spirit of trekking is to blend in with nature. Being noisy while trekking can not only be disruptive to other trekkers but also harm the natural environment. 

The mountains are a sanctuary of peace and tranquillity. We must strive to preserve that by being mindful of our noise. 

Earlier, I often saw monals, one of the most exquisite birds in our Himalayas. Nowadays, they have almost vanished. It is the noise that is driving them away. I have spotted martens and foxes on my treks. They are rarely seen among noisy trekkers. This loss makes me extremely sad.

At campsites, I frequently see trekkers who insist on singing loudly or listening to music through Bluetooth speakers. Antakshari is the go-to entertainment for trekkers.  

I find it disrespectful and disruptive to the peacefulness of nature when someone shouts, yells, or listens to loud music in the mountains. I choose to avoid that.

Being a quiet trekker has added to my overall experience in the mountains. The sounds of birds singing, the rustling of leaves in the wind, and the sound of a gentle stream all contribute to the peaceful ambience of the mountains. Being quiet, I can truly take it all in. 

At Indiahikes, we blend in with nature. We are part of nature, not just visitors. It is in this spirit that we trek.

3. We protect the environment

The third principle of the spirit of trekking is to protect the environment. This means being mindful when using resources such as water and fuel. It also means properly disposing of waste. As trekkers, we are responsible for minimising our impact and leaving the mountains better than we found them. 

Very early in my trekking life, a fellow trekker forced me to carry back all my trash. It made me realise the impact of human activities on nature. It made me more aware of my actions and their environmental effects. It made me want to do better and be more responsible.

I see our trekking trails getting impacted by trekking. Wrappers, aluminium foil, alcohol bottles, and sanitary napkins strew trails. I anguish every day about the amount of litter left behind. 

At Indiahikes, we want to be sustainable trekkers. We carry an eco-bag around our waists to pick up litter from the trail. We segregate this waste. We undo the damage others have done. It is our way of preserving our environment. 

Being sustainable on our treks has impacted my personal life as well. At home, we have significantly reduced buying packaged goods. We take our dabbas to restaurants. I have consciously moved towards leading a very minimalistic lifestyle. We focus on reducing our consumption. It feels more fulfilling. It allows me to actively contribute towards preserving our environment. 

Sustainable trekking helps reduce the impact on the environment. It promotes conservation efforts. By doing this, we make sure that future generations can also appreciate the natural beauty of our treks.

4. We are self-sufficient

The fourth principle of the spirit of trekking is self-sufficiency. This means being prepared for the trek. It means packing efficiently and taking care of yourself without relying on others. 

Recently, on exploration, we had to carry everything, including tents and cooking gear. I felt a sense of accomplishment when I completed the trek on my terms. I realised that by being self-sufficient, we could tackle every emergency. I enjoyed the trek to the fullest and took pride in my abilities.

Self-reliance is an essential aspect of trekking. 

We demonstrate self-reliance by carrying our backpacks. We pack well and light, taking only what we need and leaving behind anything unnecessary. Our backpacks weigh, at most, 8 or 9 kg. The advantage is that with a lighter backpack, we can better handle the trek's challenges. 

Self-sufficiency is knowing how to read trail maps on mobile devices (like Gaia or GeoTracker). We learn basic navigation skills before we get on the trek. On the trek, we hone our skills further. It makes us independent. We don't have to ask the trek leader how far the camp is or how long it will take.

Being self-sufficient is when we can take care of ourselves without needing help from others. Some trekkers expect others to do things for them, like clean their dishes after meals or set up their tents. But this is not fair to the people who are helping them. It's like treating our helpers like they are not important or valuable. 

I do not find it respectful to expect others to do our work for us. It's better to be able to do things ourselves and not treat others like they are there to serve us.

Being self-sufficient is a powerful reminder that we can do much more than we often give ourselves credit for. 

It also applies to my everyday life. Being self-sufficient makes me feel more confident. It helps me tackle challenges and take risks. It is a valuable life lesson that I carry with me everywhere.

5. We are supportive

The fifth principle of the spirit of trekking is being supportive. 

Being supportive entails being willing to share, whether it's lunch, water, or equipment. It's also about helping fellow trekkers when they need it. It is about putting the team first. 

Sometimes it comes with a sacrifice. On one winter trek, I had to wait more than an hour for a slower team member to catch up. It was bitingly cold. Yet, this gesture went a long way in helping my team member complete the trek. 

By being willing to share, we can build a sense of camaraderie and teamwork that helps us overcome any challenges we may face. It allows us to make lasting connections with our fellow trekkers. 

On the other recent exploration, a team member quietly took out the heavy jackets from my backpack. They were weighing me down. This support made the trek easier for me. It made me feel grateful and inspired me to trek with my fellow trekkers more frequently. 

Being supportive helps us look beyond our needs and focus on the group's well-being. This spirit reinforces the idea that trekking is not just about individual achievement. It allows us to create an unforgettable experience together as a team.

6. We are fit and prepared

The sixth principle of the spirit of trekking is to be fit and prepared. This means building up stamina and endurance, strengthening the body, and developing the necessary skills to trek long distances. 

Kugti Pass was a trek that went above 16,000 feet. On the day we crossed the pass, we started at 5 in the morning. It was a long day. We didn't set up our tents until around 5 p.m. We trekked for 12 hours at extremely high altitudes. By preparing well for the trek, I had enough energy to complete the day’s trek without tiring. I was able to truly enjoy the trek. 

Preparing well for a trek requires commitment. But it is crucial for the success of the trek. You become an equal member of the team, not a burden or hindrance. You can keep up with the group and not rely on extra resources, such as the trek leader or guide. You can be of help to the team.

On another trek, one of our trekkers developed acute AMS at the last campsite. Two fit trekkers immediately offered to help. With the help of the trek leader, they evacuated her in the middle of the night. Preparing well allows you to jump in to help in an emergency. 

On the other hand, by taking the time to prepare, you're less likely to experience injuries or discomfort, which can make for an unpleasant experience. People ask me how I descend quickly off the mountains without straining my knees. It is my preparation. 

Preparing for a trek can be both rewarding and enjoyable. Trekkers have shared how preparing for a trek has influenced their journey to becoming fitter. It is a great way to set and achieve fitness goals. Training can be a big motivation for you to lead an active lifestyle.

Green Trails

Leaving mountains better than we find them

At Indiahikes, we focus on bringing in new practices that can reduce our impact on the environment.  This is done through constant R&D.  Once these new practices are implemented we focus on achieving the results consistently on all our treks. You will see this as part of our G6 practices. 

Golden 1: Green Sweep - Clean the trail of visible litter.  We have collected more than 1,00,000 kgs of waste since 2016.

Golden 2: Segregation At Source - Segregate all waste collected so that we do not add all this waste to the landfill.  We have diverted 50% of the waste from landfill through segregation

Golden 3: Food Composting - All our kitchen waste is composted into useful humus for the mountain soil.  All food waste is either eaten by mules or composted at source.

Golden 4: Biotoilets - All our human waste is composted at source through our specially designed dry toilet pits. 

Golden 5: Water efficient dispenser  - We have reduced our waste used per trekker by 70% through specially designed water dispenser systems.

Golden 6: Save energy - We use solar panels for our energy use at our campsites.  We are also in the process of redesigning our stove and menu to reduce the amount of gas used on our treks.

Our trekkers are a big part of us keeping our promise to leave the mountains better than we found them. 

  • Indiahikes trekkers do not carry anything that can harm the environment - be it wet wipes, or any packaged food on the trek.  In fact they practice a zero waste trek.
  • Indiahikes trekkers do not buy any packaged food in the dhabas on the trek - they do not take part in feeding the demand for packaged food 
  • Indiahikes trekkers clean the trails of waste using the eco bag as part of the Green Sweep Initiattive 
  • Indiaihikes trekkers carry their own backpack on the trek. They do not offload unless absolutely necessary
  • Indiahikes trekkers do not pee/poop near any water source 
  • Indiahikes trekkers do not stray away from the marked trail

Trekkers who sign up with us pledge to follow these practices.  When you sign up with us, you do too.

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Everything you do on a trek creates an impact. The trail you trek on, the water you use, the waste you generate, how you poop, how you cook, what you eat — everything has an impact. The higher the impact, the greater the damage to the environment. 

Yet, when done sustainably, trekking is one of the most environment-friendly sports.

When you trek with Indiahikes, you trek to leave the mountains better than we found them.  This is part of our Green Trails promise.

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Why fitness matters on the Ali Bedni Bugyal Trek

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On Moderate treks, you walk for about 6-8 km each day. The ascents and descents could get steep. The maximum altitude will range between 13,000 ft to 14,000 ft. You’ll come across tricky patches frequently (like snow or scree), which require you to navigate with a certain amount of caution. There might also be small stream/river crossings.

Your goal is to 5 km with an intention to finish within 35 minutes.

Note: If you are above the age of 58 years, you'll also need to submit your Treadmill Test within 7 days of registration.

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Trek Trivia

Things Nobody Tells You About Ali Bedni Bugyal

The Unheard Pahadi Myths of Shiva and Parvati

The Ali Bedni Bugyal trek has seeped into the Shiva-Parvati mythology. While such mythological stories find their way into every household as bedtime stories, theaw pahadi stories are rarely heard of.

The entire trail of Ali Bedni marks the journey of Shiva and Parvati and their children between Kumaon valley, Parvati’s home, and Kailash Manasarovar, where Shiva and Parvati lived after their marriage. The entire route does exist and covers an aerial distance of around 155 km. 

It is said that all of them carried out this journey every four years to visit Parvati's maternal home and then return to Manasarovar. 

The peaks of Nanda Ghunti, Trishul, Bethartoli and Bethartoli south symbolise Shiva, Parvati and their children. Today, when the sky clears and these four peaks can be seen, the Pahadis believe the four of them to have reached back to their home. 

Nanda Devi Raat Jaag Yatra (pilgrimage), which occurs roughly every 12 years, is carried out on the same path in remembrance and honour of this grand journey. One of the biggest Pahadi festivals, it has a participation of 1.5 Lakh people, who hike together barefoot through this trail.

The Myths and Facts around Laatu Devta

The temple of Laatu Devta in Ali Bedni Bugyal is one of the most sacred temples. No one except one chosen priest is allowed to step inside it. The priest too, cannot go into the inner sanctum of the temple, except for a specific day and time. It is said that Laatu Devta still resides in the temple, and hence these rules. 

Surrounding this temple are huge coniferous trees which are said to be a thousand years old. Their trunks are so massive that it would take 7 to 8 people to hug one of them. 

This Devta and its temple play into the story of Shiva and Parvati's journey from Kumaon valley to Kailash Manasarovar and the Yatra (pilgrimage) along with it today. A four-horned goat, called Khaadu, symbolising Laatu Devta, not only walks along the trail covering this pilgrimage but leads it too. So, whenever a four-horned goat is born, it is raised to one day lead the Yatra. 

On the trail, all the pilgrims end their journey at Homkund lake. The Khaadu, however, walks ahead on its own, towards Manasarovar, and disappears into the mountains.

Available Dates